7 Harrington Street Chambers

Menu

Joint enterprise law wrongly interpreted, European human rights

Joint enterprise law wrongly interpreted for 30 years, Supreme Court rules

Joint Enterprise Law

The law which has allowed people to be convicted of murder even if they did not inflict the fatal blow has been wrongly interpreted for more than 30 years, the Supreme Court has ruled.

The joint enterprise law has been used to convict people in gang-related cases if defendants "could" have foreseen violent acts by their associates.

However, judges ruled it was wrong to treat "foresight" as a sufficient test.

Their decision could pave the way for hundreds of prisoners to seek appeals.

It will apply in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and most UK overseas common law territories but not in Scotland, which has its own rules on joint enterprise.
Campaigners against joint enterprise welcomed the ruling, saying it would mean a fairer law - but some murder victims' relatives said they were worried about possible appeals.

FULL STORY

Rochdale child sex grooming ringleader uses European human rights law to avoid being kicked out of UK

The ringleader of a Rochdale child sex grooming gang cited human rights laws as he launched an appeal against deportation from Britain.

Paedophile Shabir Ahmed, 63, described by a judge as a "violent hypocritical bully", has written to the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) claiming his convictions for child sex offences were a conspiracy to "scapegoat" Muslims, his immigration tribunal heard.

Ahmed, serving 22 years in jail, was convicted in 2012 of being the ringleader of a group of Asian men who preyed on girls as young as 13 in Rochdale, plying them with drink and drugs before they were "passed around" for sex.

He appeared before the First Tier Immigration Tribunal, sitting at Manchester Crown Court, on Tuesday to appeal against the decision by Secretary of State Theresa May to strip him of his British citizenship, the first stage in the deportation process.

FULL STORY

More news

Civil

With 48 Barristers operating across 6 specialist groups offering a fast, efficient advisory service

More about Civil Law

Crime

67 Barristers specialising in Criminal Law offering expert advocacy at all times

More about Criminal Law

Family

From leading Queen's Counsel to experienced and flexible juniors covering every aspect of family law

More about Family Law