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Trademarks, DNA tests and Porn

Apple and Prince featured in the news this week

Tripped Up By Trademarks

In the latest of a series of setbacks for Apple in China, a Beijing court has ruled against the global tech corporation in a trade mark battle with a Chinese company over the word "IPHONE", proving that even brand giants can be tripped up by trademarks.

Brand protection is a key consideration for today's successful businesses, and Apple is one example of a company that builds heavily on the value of its brand. From the launch of the first Macintosh computer in 1984, through the first generation iPod in 2001 and up to their most recent computers, phones and tablets, Apple's business has been founded on its marriage of technology with modern, distinctive branding. Apple is often held up as an example of branding done well, but even giants like Apple can still face problems.

One such issue has been in the news recently after Apple lost a trade mark dispute in China against Xintong Tiandi Technology (Xintong), a Chinese manufacturer of predominantly leather goods including handbags, wallets and mobile phone cases. A number of Xintong's goods were branded with the name "IPHONE", which Xintong trademarked in China in 2010 in respect of leather products.

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DNA tests to determine who is entitled to Prince's estate

A judge in the US has authorised a DNA test to determine who is entitled to Prince's estate following the singer's death last month (April 21).

Prince passed away at his Paisley Park home in Minnesota, aged 57. It was recently confirmed that he had no known will.

Now, according to the Guardian, lawyers have been given permission to obtain a sample of Prince's DNA.

A judge ruled that the move would help prevent any false paternity and inheritance claims that should arise in the aftermath of the musician's death.

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Porn site age verification laws

The Government is going to force everyone to register to use porn sites.

All sites that contain pornographic material will be forced to verify that their users are over 18, forcing them to register their age and potentially even their credit card details.

The Government has previously said that sites that don’t comply with the ruling could be banned from advertising or even shut down entirely.

The laws were re-stated in the Queen's speech, as part of the Government's "digital economy" plans.

Authorities have previously said that the blocks won’t apply just to sites that exist to distribute pornography, but to any that include pornographic material and would get an 18 rating if they were classified formally.

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